How to Chase a PB by Coach Sal

 In Blog

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HOW TO CHASE A PB

We all love to ring that bell so let’s have a look at some points to set ourselves up in the best possible way.  How do you chase a pb?!

Here is a simple checklist that will help you ring that bell once again.

1. KNOW YOUR NUMBERS
You cannot chase a pb if you don’t know where you are at in your training. Check my previous post on keeping a training journal.

2. LOOK AT THE BOARD!
You will have more pb’s for each exercise depending on the number of reps and sets to perform, so check what you are testing. Once again you should have all these noted down on your journal!

3. PERCENTAGES
Be aware of percentages when you choose your weight increase. For example: 5kg will feel completely different on top of a 1RM of 20kg vs a 1RM of 100kg; it’s a 25% vs 5% increase so play smart.

4. GAINZ
Not all exercises respond in the same way to weight increases as small/large muscle groups respond differently to stress and fatigue.  Bigger increments (2.5/5kg) can occur during exercises that are targeting bigger muscle groups like squat and deadlift.  Small muscle groups usually fatigue much quicker and take longer to adapt; you can sometimes hit the wall even with just 1kg increase. A good example are bench press and strict shoulder press.

5. NO NEED TO RETAKE PREVIOUS PB’S
We already know you can lift that weight! When building up to a new pb there is no need to retake your previous pb; doing so makes you waste energy and mental preparation without getting any ‘ring the bell’ numbers.

6. 1KG RULE
Instead of taking your previous pb again, just add 1kg to it! The effort will be really similar but now you already have a pb! Then if you feel good, just add a bit more and play to see where you can get.  This is especially true for Olympic Lifts; as technique efficiency progresses, pbs will come at a slower rate so plan smart; more and frequent improvements are better than missing many times a big one!

7. PLAN
Your warm-up weights are important, as they will set you for your attempt. Plan your weights with consistent increments to start with and small ones over 85% of your previous pb.

8. A warm up is a warm up
It is important to warm up properly but be cautious and just lift what you need. If you are testing your 1RM there is no need to do sets of 10 – 5 reps. You may do 3reps with your first couple of warm up weights, then a double and then singles only.

Play smart, lift big!

Coach Sal

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